Laws in Ohio and Michigan Regarding Window Tint

Ohio and Michigan Window Tint Laws

Window tinting is becoming more and more popular every year. It involves the process of applying a thin film of multi-layered polyester material to either the inside or outside of your car windows. However, laws pertaining to window tint vary from state to state. Some can be very strict, so it is important to do a little homework before spending money to have your car windows customized.

Ohio

Ohio’s car window tinting laws were enacted in 2004 and are pretty strict. The amount of visible light allowed through your vehicle’s windows is called VLT (Visible Light Transmission). The lower the VLT percentage, the darker the film. Ohio rules for Car, Truck, SUV, and Van windows are:

  • Front side Windows – 50% VLT
  • Windshield – 70% VLT
  • Any darkness can be used on the back seat and rear windows
  • Red and yellow tint colors are not allowed

In addition, some window tint can reflect incoming light and reduce glare and heat. Ohio window tint law permits a certain window reflection when using a tint so make sure you pay attention to this as well. Front and back side windows must not be more reflective than a standard window. This means no metallic, mirrored, or reflectorized materials are permitted.

Ohio also requires the film used to tint windows must be certified with the state of Ohio and a sticker that identifies the tint as being legal must be installed between the tint film and the glass on each window that is tinted.

Penalties for a car with illegal tint is a misdemeanor charge and $120 fine. It is also illegal for a motor vehicle dealer to sell a vehicle that does not conform to the specifications outlined in the law.

Michigan

Car window tinting laws in Michigan were enacted in 2000. Under state law, the percentage of light allowed through your film and glass in Michigan is very specific, unless accompanied by a letter from a certified physician stating a medical necessity of the motor vehicle driver.

For the windshield, a non-reflective tinted film may be applied no more than 4 inches from the top of the windshield and front side windows. Rear and rear side window tinting of any darkness is allowed, however, it must not be any more than 35% reflective. Window tint can reflect incoming light and reduce glare and heat. Michigan window tint law permits a certain window reflection when using a tint so make sure you pay attention to this as well.

No colors of tint are explicitly prohibited in Michigan and manufacturers of the film do NOT need to certify the film they sell in the state. In addition, no sticker to identify legal tinting is required by law. Keep in mind that Michigan tinting laws and regulations may be interpreted differently in your county or place of residence. It is always best to double-check information with your local DMV or law enforcement authorities.

If you are interested in getting your windows tinted and want it done professionally you can contact us at  Z-One, at 419-478-3402. We will be able to give you great looking window tint and make sure you stay in check with the law.